A Guide to Alignment in D&D 5e

In the world of Dungeons and Dragons (D&D), alignment is a way to describe a character’s moral and ethical values and beliefs. Alignment is represented by two axes: good vs evil and lawful vs chaotic. These axes are independent of each other, meaning that a character can be both good and chaotic, or evil and lawful, and everything in between.

There are nine possible alignments in D&D: lawful good, neutral good, chaotic good, lawful neutral, true neutral, chaotic neutral, lawful evil, neutral evil, and chaotic evil.

Lawful good

Lawful good characters value law and order and act in a way that is morally right. They believe in doing what is best for the greater good, and often put the needs of others before their own. Examples of lawful good characters include paladins and lawful good deities.

Neutral good

Neutral good characters value goodness and do what is right, but may not be as concerned with laws and order. They may be more independent and self-directed than lawful good characters. Examples of neutral good characters include some rangers and neutral good deities.

Chaotic good

Chaotic good characters value goodness and act in a way that is morally right, but may not follow laws and traditions. They may be more rebellious and unpredictable than lawful good or neutral good characters. Examples of chaotic good characters include some bards and chaotic good deities.

Lawful neutral

Lawful neutral characters value law and order above all else, and may not necessarily act in a way that is morally right or wrong. They may prioritize their own sense of duty or loyalty to a particular organization or code above all else. Examples of lawful neutral characters include some monks and lawful neutral deities.

Neutral

True neutral characters value balance and may not necessarily align themselves with any particular moral or ethical values. They may be more focused on personal survival or neutrality in order to avoid getting involved in conflicts. Examples of true neutral characters include some druids and true neutral deities.

Chaotic neutral

Chaotic neutral characters value their own freedom and independence above all else, and may not necessarily act in a way that is morally right or wrong. They may be unpredictable and follow their own whims rather than any particular set of laws or morals. Examples of chaotic neutral characters include some rogue characters and chaotic neutral deities.

Lawful evil

Lawful evil characters value law and order, but act in a way that is morally wrong or selfish. They may prioritize their own personal gain or the interests of their organization above all else. Examples of lawful evil characters include some villains and lawful evil deities.

Neutral evil

Neutral evil characters value their own interests and may act in a way that is morally wrong or selfish. They may not necessarily follow laws or traditions, but may not actively seek to disrupt them either. Examples of neutral evil characters include some villains and neutral evil deities.

Chaotic evil

Chaotic evil characters value their own freedom and independence, and act in a way that is morally wrong or selfish. They may actively seek to disrupt laws and traditions and may be highly unpredictable. Examples of chaotic evil characters include some villains and chaotic evil deities.

When choosing an alignment for your character, it’s important to consider their personality, motivations, and values. You should also consider how their alignment might affect their interactions with other characters and the world around them. For example, a lawful good character may have a difficult time working with a chaotic neutral character if they have very different approaches to problem-solving and decision-making.

It’s also important to keep in mind that alignment is not always black and white, and characters can change their alignment over time based on their actions and experiences. It’s okay for your character to have shades of grey and be somewhere in between the alignments listed above.

Overall, alignment is an important aspect of character creation in D&D 5e, as it helps to define a character’s moral and ethical values and beliefs. it’s important to consider their personality, motivations, and values, and how their alignment might affect their interactions with other characters and the world around them. Remember that alignment is not always black and white, and characters can change their alignment over time based on their actions and experiences.



@Katen on Instagram
This error message is only visible to WordPress admins

Error: No feed with the ID 1 found.

Please go to the Instagram Feed settings page to create a feed.

Press ESC to close